DATABASICS Time & Expense Blog

How to cut costs in travel expenses

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Let's say that the word comes down from the C-suite: you need to cut travel expenses by 10%. How are you going to do it?

For most managers of travel expense, this is an occasion for a long pause. We put in place controls and expect reasonable results. Our faith is that our process will ensure that we are keeping costs down without causing our travelers to revolt. But how do you make a real cost cut?


Related Article: How "Mobile-First" Thinking Paves The Way For Easier Expense Reporting

The usual response is to shove the problem down the organizational structure: every unit that travels is told to spend 10% less. Of course, that makes as much sense as the Federal Sequester—cuts have to be prioritized. Clearly, trip value must come into play. Do we have any tools for this?

We are pretty good at making sure that a given trip does not cost much more than it needs to, but as organizations we take a pass on judging trip value. We leave this in the hands of individual managers and travelers who are loathe to admit that a trip they authorized or took might have been a waste. Still, trip value is at the heart of cost control whether or not the mandate for cutting comes down from on high. Is there a way to objectively score a trip? Travel Policy Enforcement


DATABASICS provides cloud-based, next-generation Expense Reporting, P-Card Management, Timesheet & Leave Management, and Invoice Processing automation. Specializing in meeting the most rigorous requirements, DATABASICS offers the highest level of service to its customers around the world.

DATABASICS is relied upon by leading organizations representing all the major sectors of the global economy: financial services, healthcare, manufacturing, research, retail, engineering, non-profits/NGOs, technology, federal contractors, and other sectors.

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